Friday evening: a Madchester classic

There was a time when I made fun of the Madchester scenesters. I just slagged off The Stone Roses, Inspiral Carpets, and Happy Mondays.

But shame on me–I love it!

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Because poetry is forever…

An excerpt from a documentary on Anna Akhmatova–may her memory be eternal!

Tumbling, tumbleweed

Just when I thought that I was immune to newer social networks, last month I discovered Tumblr. Blame it on Chris Crocker–or maybe thank?
At any rate, I signed up, and after a few qlitches, began posting and following sites that piqued my interest. In many ways, I find it more satisfying than Facebook.

Singalong Sunday night

A classic gem from 1989. Leave it to John Lydon to make a bright, biting song–well, okay, several albums chockablock with melodic malcontent. If there’s a karaoke track for this tune, I want it.

Poetic interlude: Daniil Kharms

Something About Pushkin

It’s hard to say something about Pushkin to a person who doesn’t
know anything about him. Pushkin is a great poet. Napoloeon is not as
great as Pushkin. Bismarck compared to Pushkin is a nobody. And the
Alexanders, First, Second, and Third, are just little kids compared to
Pushkin. In fact, compared to Pushkin, all people are little kids, except
Gogol. Compared to him, Pushkin is a little kid.
And so, instead of writing about Pushkin, I would rather write
about Gogol.
Although, Gogol is so great that not a thing can be written about
him, so I’ll write about Pushkin after all.
Yet, after Gogol, it’s a shame to have to write about Pushkin. But
you can’t write anything about Gogol. So I’d rather not write anything
about anyone.

Daniil Kharms (1905-1942), edited and translated by Matvei Yankelevich, w. Eugene Ostashevsky

Craving salmon roe

A bit earlier, I was listening to the Spilled Milk podcast. They were talking about (and making) onigiri. And it made me a little peckish…
I’ve never eaten rice balls, but whenever I see them (in manga, or in anime) they always pique my curiosity–not to mention my appetite. And the how-to seems really simple: press together cooked, vinegared rice and your choice of fillings, and voila! A handheld, portable snack…or light meal…or whatever you please.

And I do have some keta salmon in the freezer, a recipe for sticky rice, and some ramekins for shaping the darlings. So I could whip up a batch for this evening and be quite happy. But I’m not interested in the salmon at the moment, so much as the roe. (You heard me.) I adore caviars, and salmon caviar is wonderful.

Sadly, salmon roe is also a little on the pricey side–you’re lucky to pay $10 for one ounce of the stuff. So I have to remind myself to save the pennies, shop around, and (worst case scenario) sign up for a summer job in Alaska.

In the meantime, I think I shall try my hand at making onigiri. Stay tuned.

From the art house to yours…

Courtesy of Jorge Luis Borges. Buen probecho.

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